Positive Behavioral Support by Lynn Kern Koegel
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Positive Behavioral Support
By Lynn Kern Koegel

Positive Behavioral Support

Including People with Difficult Behavior in the Community

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Format: Hardback

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Positive Behavioral Support by Lynn Kern Koegel

Book Description

This book provides positive behavioural supp ort techniques that can be used to facilitate inclusion at h ome, at school and in the community. It covers important fam ily concerns, soialisation issues and related matters in edu cational systems. '

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Book Details

ISBN: 9781557662286
ISBN-10: 1557662282
Format: Hardback
(230mm x 152mm x 25mm)
Pages: 432
Imprint: Brookes Publishing Co
Publisher: Brookes Publishing Co
Publish Date: 31-Jan-1996
Country of Publication: United States

Books By Author Lynn Kern Koegel

PRT Pocket Guide by Lynn Kern Koegel PRT Pocket Guide, Paperback (May 2012)

Developed by pioneering autism experts Robert and Lynn Koegel, this reader-friendly guide introduces and demystifies PRT one of a select group of highly effective, evidence-based treatments for autism. "

Growing Up on the Spectrum by Lynn Kern Koegel Growing Up on the Spectrum, Paperback / softback (February 2010)

From the acclaimed authors of "Overcoming Autism" comes the first comprehensive guide to helping teens with autism. Addressing universal parental concerns, this work is a beacon of hope and wisdom for parents, therapists, and educators alike.

Pivotal Response Treatments for Autism by Lynn Kern Koegel Pivotal Response Treatments for Autism, Paperback (September 2005)

This book represents the culmination of ten years of autism research by the authors. It describes Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and details how this program can help children with autism acquire language skills, form social bonds, and further their schoolwork.

» View all books by Lynn Kern Koegel


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Author Biography - Lynn Kern Koegel

Craig H. Kennedy, Ph.D., BCBA, Chair, Special Education Department, and Professor of Special Education and Pediatrics, Box 328, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37203Dr. Kennedy is Chair of the Special Education Department and Professor of Special Education and Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University and is a Vanderbilt Kennedy Center Investigator. He also is Director of the Vanderbilt Kennedy Behavior Analysis Clinic. Dr. Kennedy received a master of science degree in special education and rehabilitation from the University of Oregon and a doctorate in special education with an emphasis in quantitative sociology from the University of California, Santa Barbara.Dr. Kennedy has published more than 140 scholarly works, including the book "Single-Case Designs for Educational Research" (Allyn & Bacon, 2005). He has served as Associate Editor of the "Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis," "Journal of Behavioral Education," and "Journal of The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps."He is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and Secretary of the Board of Trustees of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is a member of the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Association for Behavior Analysis, Society for Neuroscience, and TASH. He also serves on the editorial boards of many highly respected peer-reviewed journals.In 1991, Dr. Kennedy received TASHa s Alice H. Hayden Award, and in 1993, he received the B.F. Skinner New Research Award from the American Psychological Association, Division 25. He was also recognized in 2003 for his research excellence by Peabody College at Vanderbilt University. Donald Kincaid, Ed.D., Assistant Program Director and Professor, Division of Applied Research and Educational Support (DARES), Department of Child & Family Studies, Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MHC 2113A, Tampa, Florida 33612-3899 Dr. Kincaid is the director of the Florida Positive Behavior Support Project and the Principal Investigator of the Prevent-Teach-Reinforce model. He is also a collaborator and principal investigator for the University of South Florida's subcontract with the Technical Assistance Center for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. He also serves as the co-principal investigator on Florida's Center for Inclusive Communities, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. His primary interests are in applying positive behavior support approaches for individual students, classrooms, and entire schools. Much of his professional activity involves coordinating systems change efforts at a local, state, and national level to support the implementation of evidence-based practices. Dr. Kincaid also teaches at the university level and serves on a number of editorial and advisory boards in the area of positive behavior support. Joseph M. Lucyshyn, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, and Special Education, Faculty of Education University of British Columbia. Joe Reichle, Ph.D., Professor, Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Drive Southeast, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455Dr. Joe Reichle holds appointments in the Departments of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences and Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. He is an internationally recognized expert in the areas of augmentative communication and communication intervention for persons with significant developmental disabilities and has written over 100 articles and chapters. Dr. Reichle has co-edited 10 books focused on his areas of expertise. He has served as a co-editor of the flagship journal (Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research) of the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association. Dr. Reichle was a former Associate Chair of the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences. During his 33-year career he has served as a PI, co-PI, and investigator on numerous federally funded projects. Currently, he is the Director of the University of Minnesota's Leadership Training Program in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities. Todd R. Risley, Ph.D., began his career in the early 1960s at the Institute for Child Development at the University of Washington, where he participated in the original demonstrations of the power of learning principles in influencing young children. With Montrose Wolf and Betty Hart, he introduced the basic procedures of adult attention and time-out now routinely taught and used in teaching and parenting. He also helped introduce the procedures for shaping speech and language widely used in special education. In 1965, Hart and Risley began more than 35 years of collaborative work at the University of Kansas, when they established preschool intervention programs in poverty neighborhoods in Kansas City. Their study of what children actually do and say in day care and preschool and their publications on incidental teaching from the empirical base for contemporary child-centered teaching practices in preschool and special education. Before his death in 2007, Dr. Risley was Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Alaska and Senior Scientist at the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies at The University of Kansas. He served on many national boards and commissions, as Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, as President of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy and of the behavioral division of the American Psychological Association, and as Alaska's Director of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities. Laura Schreibman, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychology, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093. Dr. Laura Schreibman directs the UCSD Autism Intervention Research Program, a federally funded research program focusing on the experimental analysis and treatment of autism. A co-developer of Pivotal Response Training, her general research interests include naturalistic behavioral intervention strategies, development of individualized treatment protocols, analysis of language and attentional deficits, generalization of behavior change, parent training, and issues of assessment. She is the author of three books and more than 120 research articles and book chapters. Aubyn C. Stahmer, Ph.D., BCBA, Research Scientist, Psychologist, Rady Children s Hospital, 3020 Children sWay, MC5033, San Diego, California 92123. Dr. Stahmer is a research scientist and clinical psychologist at Rady Children s Hospital and the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center. She has published many scholarly articles on inclusion and early intervention services in the area of autism. Her current interests include the study of early intervention systems for children with autism and the translation of evidence-based practices into community settings. Phillip Strain, Ph.D., Professor, School of Education and Human Development, University of Colorado at Denver, 1380 Lawrence Street, Suite 650, Denver, Colorado 80204-2076 Dr. Strain is a professor of Educational Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Colorado at Denver. He is the author of more than 250 scientific papers and he serves on the editorial boards of more than a dozen professional journals. Dr. Strain has worked in the field of early intervention since 1974, and he serves as a science advisor to the Institute of Medicine, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the U.S. Department of Education. His primary research interests include intervention for young children with early-onset conduct disorders; remediation of social behavior deficits in young children with autism; design and delivery of community-based, comprehensive early intervention for children with autism; and analysis of individual and systemic variables affecting the adoption and sustained use of evidence-based practices for children with severe behavior disorders. Lynn Kern Koegel, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Clinic Director at the Autism Research Center of the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has been active in the development of programs to improve communication in children with autism, including the development of first words, development of grammatical structures, and pragmatics. Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel is co-author and co-editor of major textbooks on autism and positive behavioral support and is co-author of the bestselling book "Overcoming Autism: Finding the Answers, Strategies, and Hope That Can Transform a Child's Life" (Penguin, 2004). In addition to her published books and articles in the area of communication and language development, she has developed and published prodcedures and field manuals in the area of self-management and functional analysis that are used in school districts throughout the United States and have been translated in most major languages used throughout the world. Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel is actively involved in providing support and intervention services in school districts, both locally in California and throughout the United States. She has also been featured in news reports on television stations throughout the United States and acted as a consultant for the internationally broadcast ABC television series "Supernanny." Robert L. Koegel, Ph.D., is Director of the Autism Research Center, Professor of Educational Psychology and Counseling/Clinical/School Psychology, and Professor of Special Education, Disability, and Risk Studies at the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Robert L. Koegel is internationally known for his work in the area of autism, specializing in language intervention, family support, and school inclusion. He has published well over 150 articles and papers relating to the treatment of autism. He also has authored five books on the treatment of autism and on positive behavioral support. He has been the recipient of numerous multimillion-dollar research and training grants from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Education, and the National Institute of Mental Health. Models of his procedures have been used in public schools and in parent education programs throughout California and the United States, as well as other countries. Glen Dunlap, Ph.D., Research Professor, Division of Applied Research and Educational Support (DARES), Department of Child & Family Studies, Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612-3899 Dr. Dunlap is a research professor at the University of South Florida, where he works on several research, training, and demonstration projects in the areas of positive behavior support, child protection, early intervention, developmental disabilities, and family support. He has been involved with individuals with disabilities for more than 35 years and has served as a teacher, administrator, researcher, and university faculty member. Dr. Dunlap has directed numerous research and training projects and has been awarded dozens of federal and state grants to pursue this work. He has authored more than 185 articles and book chapters, coedited four books, and served on 15 editorial boards. Dr. Dunlap was a founding editor of the "Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions" and is the current editor of "Topics in Early Childhood Special Education." He moved to Reno, Nevada, in 2005, where he continues to work on research and training projects as a member of the faculty at the University of South Florida. Dr. Lise Fox is a professor in the Department of Child and Family Studies of the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida and the Co-Director of Florida Center for Inclusive Communities: A University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (www.flcic.org ). Lise was the Principal Investigator of the Technical Assistance Center for Social Emotional Intervention (www.challengingbehavior.org) funded by the Office of Special Education Programs. Dr. Fox is engaged in research and training efforts related to the implementation of the Pyramid Model in early education and care classrooms, program-wide models of implementation, and positive behavior support. She received the Mary E. McEvoy Service to the Field Award from the Division for Early Childhood. Richard W. Albin, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Educational and Community Supports in the College of Education at the University of Oregon. Stephen Camarata, Ph.D., Professor, Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1215 21st Avenue South, Suite 8310, Nashville, TN 37232 Stephen Camarata is a nationally and internationally renowned clinician-scientist who studies late-talking children. His research focuses on the assessment and treatment of speech and language disorders in children with disabilities such as autism, Down syndrome, and specific language impairment. He also studies children whose late onset of talking appears to be a natural developmental stage rather than a symptom of a broader developmental disability. Edward G. Carr, Ph.D., was Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and a research scientist at the Developmental Disabilities Institute on Long island, New York. He worked in the field of developmental disabilities for over 25 years and contributed over 100 publications to the professional literature, primarily in the areas of problem behavior and communication. Dr. Carr lectured extensively and gave workshops throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe. He served on the editorial boards of 12 journals in the field of developmental disabilities and behavior analysis. Dr. Carr was a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and was listed in American Men and Women of Science. In 1981, he received a Certificate of Commendation from the Autism Society of America for his work on problem behavior, and in 1982 he received an award from the International Society for Research on Aggression for his book "In Response to Aggression" (co-authored with A.P. Goldstein, W.S. Davidson, and P. Wehr). Carol Davis, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Special Education, University of Washington, Box 353600, Seattle, Washington 98195. Dr. Davisa s research interests include examining effective instructional practices that facilitate skill acquisition and promote positive behavior of students with moderate to profound disabilities in inclusive settings, identifying variables that contribute to the use of effective strategies by teachers in these settings, and developing systems to support students with severe disabilities to have access to the general education curriculum within the public school setting. Kathleen M. Feeley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Special Education and Literacy, C.W. Post Campus, Long Island University, Brookville, New York 11367 Dr. Feeley is the clinical coordinator for the Certifi cate in Autism and Special Education Program at C.W. Post Campus, Long Island University. As the founder and director of the Center for Community Inclusion at C.W. Post Campus, Dr. Feeley provides training and technical assistance to families, school districts, and adult service agencies as they include individuals with developmental disabilities within their communities. She is also Senior Editor for the journal "Down Syndrome Research and Practice" and is a member of the international research group Research Action for People with Down Syndrome (RAPID), sponsored by Down Syndrome International. Dr. Horner is the Alumni-Knight Endowed Professor of Special Education at the University of Oregon, where he directs the Educational and Community Supports research unit. He received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Stanford University, his master's degree in experimental psychology from Washington State University, and his doctorate in special education from the University of Oregon. Dr. Horner's research has focused on developing evidence-based interventions that result in socially significant changes for people with and without disabilities. As co-director with Dr. George Sugai of the Office of Special Education Programs Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, Dr. Horner coordinates research and technical assistance activities with multiple partners across the nation. During the past 20 years, he has worked directly with schools and school administrators in the development of approaches for implementing school-wide systems of positive behavior support. He has been the editor of the "Journal of The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps," co-editor of the "Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions," and associate editor for the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the American Journal on Mental Retardation." In recognition of his achievements, Dr. Horner has received multiple awards, among them the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis Public Service Behavior Analysis Award (2006), the American Association on Mental Retardation Education Award (2002), the TASH Positive Approaches Award (2000), and the American Psychological Association Fred Keller Educational Research Award (1996). Susan S. Johnston, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Special Education, University of Utah, 1705 East Campus Center Drive, Room 221, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Dr. Johnston conducts research, teaches, and provides technical assistance in the areas of augmentative and alternative communication, early language and literacy intervention, and early childhood special education. During her tenure at the University of Utah, Dr. Johnston served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Education and currently serves as Director of International Initiatives for the College of Education. She received her Master of Arts degree and doctorate in speech-language pathology from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Ann P. Kaiser, Ph.D., Susan W. Gray Professor of Education and Human Development, Department of Special Education, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37203Dr. Ann Kaiser is the Susan W. Gray Professor of Education and Human Development at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. Dr. Kaiser's research focuses on early language interventions for children with developmental disabilities and children at risk due to poverty. She has developed and researched an early communication program to improve the language outcomes for young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, children with autism, and children at risk due to behavior problems. "

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