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Human-Computer Interaction draws on the fields of computer science, psychology, cognitive science, and organisational and social sciences in order to understand how people use and experience interactive technology. Until now, researchers have been forced to return to the individual subjects to learn about research methods and how to adapt them to the particular challenges of HCI. This book provides a single resource through which a range of commonly used research methods in HCI are introduced. Chapters are authored by internationally leading HCI researchers who use examples from their own work to illustrate how the methods apply in an HCI context. Each chapter also contains key references to help researchers find out more about each method as it has been used in HCI. Topics covered include experimental design, use of eyetracking, qualitative research methods, cognitive modelling, how to develop new methodologies and writing up your research.

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Book Details

ISBN: 9780521690317
ISBN-10: 0521690315
Format: Paperback
(247mm x 174mm x 14mm)
Pages: 260
Imprint: Cambridge University Press
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publish Date: 21-Aug-2008
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

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Author Biography - Paul Cairns

Paul Cairns is Senior Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction at the University of York's Department of Computer Science, and was previously a lecturer at the UCL Interaction Centre. He has strong interests in sound research methods for human-computer interaction with an emphasis on different statistical analysis and modelling methods, and is also very interested in the experience of playing games, specifically what it means for a player to be immersed in the game. Anna L. Cox is Lecturer in Human-Computer Interaction at the UCL Interaction Centre, University College London.