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Evolution has long shaped human behavior. Yet just recently have we learned that evolution based on natural selection is not the continuous process Darwin assumed. It is instead a two-part process of change and stability called punctuated equilibrium, with natural selection operating mainly on the frontiers of change. Taking account of biology's latest understanding of evolution, it becomes clear that culture evolves by a similar process. This is important because over the past 30,000 years most human evolution and the behavioral changes that go with it have occurred in our cultures-not in our genes. Knowing the process by which culture evolves clarifies the origin of many of our current problems, both within and between cultures. The author contends that new technology drives cultural evolution much as mutations change our DNA. The problem is that technology is now coming at us so fast that it is inducing "circuit overload" in cultures all over the world, leading to conflict. Techno-Cultural Evolution, which builds on the insights of such bestsellers as Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse, explains how this process works - and what it means for all of us.

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Book Details

ISBN: 9781597971072
ISBN-10: 1597971073
Format: Paperback
(229mm x 152mm x 22mm)
Pages: 288
Imprint: Potomac Books Inc
Publisher: Potomac Books Inc
Publish Date: 19-Jul-2007
Country of Publication: United States

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Author Biography - William McDonald Wallace

William McDonald Wallace, Ph.D., retired from the Boeing Company in 1992 as chief economist of commercial airplanes. He was dean of the School of Business at St. Martin's University in Lacey, Washington, from 1998 until 2006. He lives on a small tree farm near the Olympic National Park.