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One of the most irrepressible and exuberant characters in the history of literature, Tom Sawyer explodes onto the page in a whirl of bad behaviour and incredible adventures. Whether he is heaving clods of earth at his brother, faking a gangrenous toe, or trying to convince the world that he is dead, Tom's infectious energy and good humor shine through. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is Mark Twain's joyful and nostalgic recollection of tall tales from his own boyhood by the Mississippi some 'thirty or forty years ago', an instant success on first publication in 1876 and a delight to children of all ages ever since.With an Afterword by Peter Harness.

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Book Details

ISBN: 9781904633471
ISBN-10: 1904633471
Format: Hardback
(157mm x 100mm x 15mm)
Pages: 264
Imprint: Macmillan Collector's Library
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
Publish Date: 1-Feb-2004
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

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Author Biography - Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens was born in Missouri in 1835, the son of a lawyer. Early in his childhood, the family moved to Hannibal, Missouri - a town which would provide the inspiration for St Petersburg in Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. After a period spent as a travelling printer, Clemens became a river pilot on the Mississippi: a time he would look back upon as his happiest. When he turned to writing in his thirties, he adopted the pseudonym Mark Twain ('Mark Twain' is the cry of a Mississippi boatman taking depth measurements, and means 'two fathoms'), and a number of highly successful publications followed, including The Prince and the Pauper (1882), Huckleberry Finn (1884) and A Connecticut Yankee (1889). His later life, however, was marked by personal tragedy and sadness, as well as financial difficulty. In 1894, several businesses in which he had invested failed, and he was declared bankrupt. Over the next fifteen years - during which he managed to regain some measure of financial independence - he saw the deaths of two of his beloved daughters, and his wife. Increasingly bitter and depressed, Twain died in 1910, aged seventy-five.