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Description - Herland (Vintage Future) by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

COVER DESIGNS THAT COME TO LIFE! ANIMATE THE COVER WITH THE FREE INSERTED SHEET

When three American men discover a community of women, living in perfect isolation in the Amazon, they decide there simply must be men somewhere. How could these women survive without man's knowledge, experience and strength, not to mention reproductive power? In fact, what they have found is a civilisation free from disease, poverty and the weight of tradition. All alone, the women have created a society of calm and prosperity, a feminist utopia that dares to threaten the very concept of male superiority.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY LINDY WEST

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Book Details

ISBN: 9781784871024
ISBN-10: 1784871028
Format: Paperback / softback
(178mm x 114mm x 15mm)
Pages: 240
Imprint: Vintage Classics
Publisher: Vintage Publishing
Publish Date: 7-Apr-2016
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

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Author Biography - Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in 1860 in Connecticut. She was a feminist and journalist and author of a number of fiction and non-fiction works. These include Women and Economics (1898), Concerning Children (1900), The Home- Its Work and Influence (1903) and Herland (1915). She is best remembered for her short story 'The Yellow Wallpaper' which describes the descent of a woman into madness following a 'rest cure'. Unconventional in many ways, Gilman's life included two marriages and separation from her nine-year-old daughter, whom she sent to live with her ex-husband and his new wife. She was a Suffragette, a public speaker on social issues and the editor of a number of literary magazines during her career. In 1932, Gilman was diagnosed with incurable breast cancer and, as an advocate of euthanasia, she took the decision to commit suicide. She did this on 17 August 1935 by taking an overdose of chloroform.

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