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Description - Magnetism in Carbon Nanostructures by Frank Hagelberg

Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

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Book Details

ISBN: 9781107069848
ISBN-10: 110706984X
Format: Hardback
(247mm x 174mm x 24mm)
Pages: 472
Imprint: Cambridge University Press
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publish Date: 13-Jul-2017
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

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Author Biography - Frank Hagelberg

Frank Hagelberg is a Professor of Physics at East Tennessee State University and a member of the American Physical Society. His current work focuses on electronic structure methods applied to problems of nanoscience.